Fr. Carr to offer TLM on Saturday, Monday mornings

The Traditional Latin Mass (Extraordinary Form) will be offered this coming Saturday morning and Monday morning by Reverend Father Richard Carr at St. Michael Church, 7401 St. Michael’s Lane, Annandale.

On Saturday morning, July 22, at 7:00 am, Low Mass of the Feast of St. Mary Magdelene will be offered. A low Ferial Mass will be offered at 6:45 am on Monday morning, July 24.

Please note that these Masses are scheduled at the discretion of the celebrant, and are not part of the parish’s published Mass calendar. These Masses have been added to our seven-day schedule.

Fr. Carr to offer TLM this Saturday morning

The Traditional Latin Mass (Extraordinary Form) will be offered at 7:00 am on Saturday morning, July 15, at St. Michael Church, 7401 St. Michael’s Lane, Annandale. Reverend Father Richard Carr will celebrate Low Mass for the Feast of St. Henry I, Holy Roman Emperor, Confessor.

Please note that this Mass is scheduled at the discretion of the celebrant, and is not part of the parish’s published Mass calendar. This Mass has been added to our seven-day schedule.

No Silver Spring TLM on Sunday, July 16

Due to the unavailability of a celebrant, no Traditional Mass will be celebrated at the Silver Spring TLM Congregation this coming Sunday, July 16. We encourage attendees to consult our seven-day schedule to find a Traditional Mass elsewhere in the area.

Decisions are pending regarding Masses for the remainder of July. Priests who would be interested in celebrating Mass at Silver Spring on July 23 or 30 are encouraged to contact us so that we may pass your information along to the congregation’s chaplain.

Low Mass to be offered Thursday evening at Fairfax St. Leo the Great

A Low Mass in the Extraordinary Form will be celebrated at St. Leo the Great Church in Fairfax at 7:00 pm on Thursday evening, July 13. This Mass has been added to our seven-day schedule.

Thursday evening Low Masses will not be offered on July 20, July 27, or August 3. The regular weekly schedule will resume on August 10.

St. Leo the Great Church is located at 3700 Old Lee Highway, between U.S. Route 50 and Main Street in Fairfax. Ample free parking is available.

Fr. Carr to offer TLMs Friday afternoon, Saturday morning

The Traditional Latin Mass (Extraordinary Form) will be offered on Friday afternoon and Saturday morning of this week by Reverend Father Richard Carr at St. Michael Church, 7401 St. Michael’s Lane, Annandale.

On Friday afternoon, July 7, Low Mass of the Feast of Ss. Cyril & Methodius will be offered at 4:30 pm. Low Mass of the Feast of St. Elizabeth of Portugal will be offered at 7:00 am on Saturday morning, July 8.

Please note that these Masses are scheduled at the discretion of the celebrant, and are not part of the parish’s published Mass calendar. These Masses have been added to our seven-day schedule.

Unfettered biotechnology produces monstrous human injustices

From Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical Caritas in Veritate (2009):

Paul VI had already recognized and drawn attention to the global dimension of the social question.155 Following his lead, we need to affirm today that the social question has become a radically anthropological question, in the sense that it concerns not just how life is conceived but also how it is manipulated, as bio-technology places it increasingly under man’s control. In vitro fertilization, embryo research, the possibility of manufacturing clones and human hybrids: all this is now emerging and being promoted in today’s highly disillusioned culture, which believes it has mastered every mystery, because the origin of life is now within our grasp. Here we see the clearest expression of technology’s supremacy. In this type of culture, the conscience is simply invited to take note of technological possibilities. Yet we must not underestimate the disturbing scenarios that threaten our future, or the powerful new instruments that the “culture of death” has at its disposal. To the tragic and widespread scourge of abortion we may well have to add in the future — indeed it is already surreptiously present — the systematic eugenic programming of births. At the other end of the spectrum, a pro-euthanasia mindset is making inroads as an equally damaging assertion of control over life that under certain circumstances is deemed no longer worth living. Underlying these scenarios are cultural viewpoints that deny human dignity. These practices in turn foster a materialistic and mechanistic understanding of human life. Who could measure the negative effects of this kind of mentality for development? How can we be surprised by the indifference shown towards situations of human degradation, when such indifference extends even to our attitude towards what is and is not human? What is astonishing is the arbitrary and selective determination of what to put forward today as worthy of respect. Insignificant matters are considered shocking, yet unprecedented injustices seem to be widely tolerated. While the poor of the world continue knocking on the doors of the rich, the world of affluence runs the risk of no longer hearing those knocks, on account of a conscience that can no longer distinguish what is human. God reveals man to himself; reason and faith work hand in hand to demonstrate to us what is good, provided we want to see it; the natural law, in which creative Reason shines forth, reveals our greatness, but also our wretchedness insofar as we fail to recognize the call to moral truth.

155 Cf. Paul VI, Encyclical Letter Populorum Progressio, 41: Acta Apostolicæ Sedis 59 (1967), 258.

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Migrants and their families must not be treated as mere labor commodities

From Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical Caritas in Veritate (2009):

Another aspect of integral human development that is worthy of attention is the phenomenon of migration. This is a striking phenomenon because of the sheer numbers of people involved, the social, economic, political, cultural and religious problems it raises, and the dramatic challenges it poses to nations and the international community. We can say that we are facing a social phenomenon of epoch-making proportions that requires bold, forward-looking policies of international cooperation if it is to be handled effectively. Such policies should set out from close collaboration between the migrants’ countries of origin and their countries of destination; it should be accompanied by adequate international norms able to coordinate different legislative systems with a view to safeguarding the needs and rights of individual migrants and their families, and at the same time, those of the host countries. No country can be expected to address today’s problems of migration by itself. We are all witnesses of the burden of suffering, the dislocation and the aspirations that accompany the flow of migrants. The phenomenon, as everyone knows, is difficult to manage; but there is no doubt that foreign workers, despite any difficulties concerning integration, make a significant contribution to the economic development of the host country through their labour, besides that which they make to their country of origin through the money they send home. Obviously, these labourers cannot be considered as a commodity or a mere workforce. They must not, therefore, be treated like any other factor of production. Every migrant is a human person who, as such, possesses fundamental, inalienable rights that must be respected by everyone and in every circumstance.142

142 Cf. Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People, Instruction Erga Migrantes Caritas Christi (3 May 2004): Acta Apostolicæ Sedis 96 (2004), 762-822.

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Ascension Thursday TLM set at Silver Spring

A Low Mass will be offered at 5:00 pm this Thursday afternoon, May 5, at the Traditional Latin Mass Congregation of Silver Spring, Maryland. Reverend Father David Friel of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will be the celebrant of the Mass of the Feast of the Ascension.

Silver Spring TLM Congregation meets at the Historic Church of St. John the Evangelist, 9700 Rosensteel Avenue, Forest Glen. Ample free parking is available.

Members of society share reciprocal duties as well as rights

From Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical Caritas in Veritate (2009):

“The reality of human solidarity, which is a benefit for us, also imposes a duty.”105 Many people today would claim that they owe nothing to anyone, except to themselves. They are concerned only with their rights, and they often have great difficulty in taking responsibility for their own and other people’s integral development. Hence it is important to call for a renewed reflection on how rights presuppose duties, if they are not to become mere licence.106 Nowadays we are witnessing a grave inconsistency. On the one hand, appeals are made to alleged rights, arbitrary and non-essential in nature,* accompanied by the demand that they be recognized and promoted by public structures, while, on the other hand, elementary and basic rights remain unacknowledged and are violated in much of the world.107 A link has often been noted between claims to a “right to excess”, and even to transgression and vice, within affluent societies, and the lack of food, drinkable water, basic instruction and elementary health care in areas of the underdeveloped world and on the outskirts of large metropolitan centres. The link consists in this: individual rights, when detached from a framework of duties which grants them their full meaning, can run wild, leading to an escalation of demands which is effectively unlimited and indiscriminate. An overemphasis on rights leads to a disregard for duties. Duties set a limit on rights because they point to the anthropological and ethical framework of which rights are a part, in this way ensuring that they do not become licence. Duties thereby reinforce rights and call for their defence and promotion as a task to be undertaken in the service of the common good. Otherwise, if the only basis of human rights is to be found in the deliberations of an assembly of citizens, those rights can be changed at any time, and so the duty to respect and pursue them fades from the common consciousness. Governments and international bodies can then lose sight of the objectivity and “inviolability” of rights. When this happens, the authentic development of peoples is endangered.108 Such a way of thinking and acting compromises the authority of international bodies, especially in the eyes of those countries most in need of development. Indeed, the latter demand that the international community take up the duty of helping them to be “artisans of their own destiny,”109 that is, to take up duties of their own. The sharing of reciprocal duties is a more powerful incentive to action than the mere assertion of rights.

105 Paul VI, Encyclical Letter Populorum Progressio, 17: Acta Apostolicæ Sedis [AAS] 59 (1967), 265-266.
106 Cf. John Paul II, Message for the 2003 World Day of Peace, 5: AAS 95 (2003), 343.
107 Cf. ibid.
108 Cf. Benedict XVI, Message for the 2007 World Day of Peace, 13.
109 Paul VI, Encyclical Letter Populorum Progressio, 65: loc. cit., 289.

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* Those to sexual and “reproductive” license and to the destruction and distortion of family structures being the most notorious examples, then and now. — Ed.

Fr. Langevin to offer Dominican Rite Mass Sunday at Silver Spring

A Low Mass in the Traditional Dominican Rite will be offered Sunday, May 21, at the Traditional Latin Mass Congregation of Silver Spring, Maryland. The celebrant of the Mass of the Fifth Sunday after Easter will be Reverend Father Dominic Langevin op, Instructor in Systematic Theology at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington.

Holy Mass will begin at 8:00 am. Confessions will be heard from 7:10 to 7:50 am.

Silver Spring TLM Congregation meets at the Historic Church of St. John the Evangelist, 9700 Rosensteel Avenue, Forest Glen. Ample free parking is available.