A first-century witness for Roman Catholic unity

Click the play button in the audio bar below to hear a sermon that was preached at the Church of St. Thomas Apostle in Washington, D.C., by Reverend Monsignor Andrew Wadsworth of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri on the feast of Pope St. Clement I, November 23, 2015.

We thank Brother Rector Jeff Bedia of the Little Oratory for the audio file.

Pray the Rosary every day for victory and peace

Click the play button in the audio bar below to hear a sermon that was preached at the Church of St. Thomas Apostle in Washington, D.C., by Reverend Monsignor Andrew Wadsworth of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri on the feast of Our Lady of the Rosary, October 7, 2014.

We thank Brother Rector Jeff Bedia of the Little Oratory for the audio file.

Our Lady’s sorrows: a participation in salvation

Click the play button in the audio bar below to hear a sermon preached at the Church of St. Thomas Apostle in Washington, D.C., by Reverend Monsignor Andrew Wadsworth of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri on the feast of Our Lady of Sorrows, September 15, 2015.

We thank Brother Rector Jeff Bedia of the Little Oratory for the audio file.

St. John the Baptist: our patron and exemplar for the coming trials

Here is a sermon preached at the Church of St. Thomas Apostle in Washington, D.C., by Reverend Monsignor Andrew Wadsworth of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri on the feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist, August 29, 2015.

Decollation-caravaggio

We thank Brother Rector Jeff Bedia of the Little Oratory for the link and the illustration by Caravaggio.

Where do I want to eat?

From an unofficial translation of the homily of the Holy Father, Pope Francis, at the square of the Basilica of St. John Lateran on Corpus Christi 2014:

If we look around us, we realize that there are so many food offerings that are not from the Lord and that apparently meet more. Some are fed with money, others with success and vanity, others with power and pride. But the food that nourishes us and that really satisfies us is only what the Lord gives us! The food that the Lord offers us is different, and maybe it does not seem as tasty as some food that gives us the world. So we dream of other meals, like the Jews in the desert, who regretted the meat and onions they ate in Egypt, but they forgot that those meals they ate at the table of slavery. They, in those moments of temptation, they had memory, but a memory sick, a selective memory. A memory of a slave, not of being free.

Each of us, today, it may be asked, and I? Where do I want to eat? At which table do I want to fed? The Lord’s table? Or dream of eating tasty food, but in slavery? In addition, each of us can ask ourselves: what is my memory? That the Lord save me, or that garlic and onions of slavery? With what memory I satiated my soul?

The Father tells us: “I have fed you with manna which you did not know.” We recover the memory. This is the task, retrieve the memory. And we learn to recognize the fake bread which deceives and corrupts, because the result of selfishness, self and sin.

Members of the body of Christ

From a sermon preached on the Second Sunday after Easter 2014 by Rev. Fr. James Bradley of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham:

Monsignor Ronald Knox, commenting on the parable of the good shepherd which we hear in today’s gospel, writes that just as the shepherd guides and cares for each of his flock individually, so God in this very church “doesn’t see a mob of people hearing Mass; he sees you and me” (Knox, Homily on 31 August 1947). Of course, we come as the Church at prayer in the Eucharistic sacrifice, but we also come, each of us, as the individuals who make up the Body of Christ, to receive the sacrament of his body and blood. The Lord knows us each and we, by our reverence and devotion to him in Holy Communion — by our proper disposition and preparation — come to know and acknowledge him.