How to hear Mass well (part 6)

This is the sixth in a series of excerpts from an essay written around the year 1800 by Reverend Father Leonard Gossine and republished in the March 31, 2015, issue of The Remnant:

The Church desires that the faithful should unite themselves at every Mass with Jesus by Communion, and through Him with His Heavenly Father, becoming one with Him, which is the great end of the Sacrifice of Jesus. But as actual Communion at every Mass is not possible, we should receive Communion spiritually, that is, excite in ourselves the fervent desire to be spiritually united with Christ; spiritually because we can then receive only the spiritual gifts and graces given to those who receive Him sacramentally.

If we desire to make a spiritual Communion with the priest at Mass, then we should, after the Pater Noster, sincerely repent of our sins, awaken in ourselves a vivid faith in Christ’s presence, a firm confidence in His merits, and a fervent love for Him, and then at the priest’s Communion excite within us an ardent desire to receive Christ and be united to Him. When this is done, we should thank God for the graces we have received and recall to our minds, during the day, the goodness and love of this divine Saviour, whose pleasure it is to be with the children of men, to enrich them with His blessings.

To be continued…

How to hear Mass well (part 5)

This is the fifth in a series of excerpts from an essay written around the year 1800 by Reverend Father Leonard Gossine and republished in the March 31, 2015, issue of The Remnant:

At the Elevation, we should with the priest, in deepest reverence, adore Jesus, offering Him, the true Lamb of Sacrifice, to God the Father, for His Glory, in thanksgiving for graces received, in satisfaction for our sins and for the sins of the whole world; for help in our needs and our weakness, and in supplication for new graces, offering ourselves also entirely for the same objects.

After the Elevation, we should adore the Saviour present on the altar, thank Him for His gracious condescension, exciting in ourselves the ardent desire of a sincere union with Him and through Him with His Heavenly Father.

To be continued…

How to hear Mass well (part 4)

This is the fourth in a series of excerpts from an article written around the year 1800 by Reverend Father Leonard Gossine and republished in the March 31, 2015, issue of The Remnant:

We can [at the Memento for the living] follow St. Francis Borgia, who vividly represented to himself, during the holy Sacrifice, the Bloody Sacrifice of Jesus on the Cross and meditated in his memento upon the five wounds of Jesus. At the thought of the wound of the right hand, he recommended to God the Pope, bishops and priests; at the wound of the left hand, officers of justice, and heads of civil power; at the wound of the right foot, all spiritual orders; at the left, all relations, friends, benefactors, and all who had commended themselves to his prayers. The wound in the side he reserved for himself; into this he entered and hid himself with all his wishes and anxieties. He made the memento for the dead in the same way, commending his departed friends, benefactors and all for who he intended to pray, and all forsaken souls, through the wounds of Jesus, offering them with Him to God.

To be continued…

How to hear Mass well (part 3)

This is the third in a series of excerpts from an article written around the year 1800 by Reverend Father Leonard Gossine and republished in the March 31, 2015, issue of The Remnant:

To [offer Holy Mass with the priest], we should humble ourselves with the priest at the foot of the altar, as poor sinners before God, imploring mercy; at the Gloria praise God with the priest, at the Epistle and Gospel thank God for His sacred word, resolving to live in accord and with it; at the Credo make a profession of faith with heart and lips, earnestly promising to live and die in the Holy Catholic Church; at the Offertory offer our heart with all its desires and inclinations, a profession of faith with ear and lips, earnestly promising sacrifice to God; at the Sanctus to praise God with all the angels and saints. Before the Elevation we should be sincerely sorry for our sins, consider that we are unworthy to appear in the sight of God, remember that we must make satisfaction for our sins, and, during the Memento for the living, make a memento with the priest.

To be continued…

How to hear Mass well (part 2)

This is the second in a series of excerpts from an article written around the year 1800 by Reverend Father Leonard Gossine and republished in the March 31, 2015, issue of The Remnant:

[W]e must hear Mass in a three-fold manner. First, by remembering at the beginning of the Mass, that we ourselves should be the offering of reconciliation to God’s justice, but that Jesus, the Son of God, out of infinite love, gave Himself to us as an offering by which we become reconciled with His Father, perfectly glorify and thank Him; and though the priest stands alone at the altar, alone speaking, and with his hands offers the sacrifice, we must unite ourselves with him and offer the sacrifice with him. The first manner of hearing Mass is to perform the sacrifice with the priest, doing as far as we can, in spirit, that which he does, remembering that we have met not only to hear Mass, but at the same time to perform and offer the sacrifice with the priest.

To be continued…

How to hear Mass well

This is the first in a series of excerpts from an article written around the year 1800 by Reverend Father Leonard Gossine and republished in the March 31, 2015, issue of The Remnant:

In order to hear Mass profitably in the sense and spirit of the Church, we should know, in the first place, that the Mass is that sacrifice, which we should offer with our whole being, with all that we are or have, to Almighty God for His glory, in satisfaction for our sins, in thanksgiving for graces received and in supplication for those still necessary, a sacrifice which we ourselves, because of our wretched sinfulness, cannot offer and therefore Christ Himself offers for us; we should be united with God by the most intimate participation in the Sacrifice of Jesus, and we should understand that the Sacrifice of the Mass is also an unbloody renewal of the sacrifice on Calvary.

To be continued…